2020: Week 2 & Week 3 Reading Roundup

Sunday.5.January – Saturday.11.January

Sunday.12.January – Saturday.18.January

So I said I was back and then dropped the ball on blogging. Sorry!! Still trying to get back into the groove of things 🙂


FINISHED READING:
5

The Kingdom of Back by Marie Lu

* Thank you BookishFirst for providing a copy of this book in exchange for a review. All opinions expressed are my own and based solely on the galley provided *

Expected Publication Date: March.3.2020

This is Marie Lu’s first foray into YA historical fiction and I must say, it is fabulous. It follows the story of Nannerl, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s older sister. She longs to be remembered as a composer but knows the reality of it happening is slim. Not because of her lack of talent (she is a child prodigy), but because she is a girl. The story also has fantasy elements, inspired by a fictional world created by the real Mozart children. {4.5*

We Were Eight Years in Power: An American Tragedy by Ta-Nehisi Coates


This book is part-memoir. Coates gives brief insight into how/why he was inspired to write various articles, followed by said publication. The article that really got me thinking was The Case for Reparations (which you can read HERE). I found it very thought-provoking and incredibly well-written. {3.75*}

We Are Displaced: My Journey and Stories From Refugee Girls Around the World by Malala Yousafzai

The book begins with Malala recounting her own experience with being an IDP (Internally Displaced Person) when the Taliban moved into her hometown. In each subsequent chapter, the reader is introduced to a different young girl from around the world that details her own harrowing experience with being a refugee. A must-read! {4.75*}

Woven in Moonlight by Isabel Ibañez

* Thank you BookishFirst for providing a copy of this book in exchange for a review. All opinions expressed are my own and based solely on the copy provided. *

A beautiful mix of fantasy and Bolivian culture. The basis of the story is inspired by real events. In Inkasisa, the indigenous Llacsan people have revolted, wresting power from the ruling Illustrians. The new King Atoc, hopes to solidify the legitimacy of his rule by marrying the sole surviving royal, Catalina the Condesa. But since the overthrow when she was 8 years old, the real Condesa’s identity is hidden, being replaced by a decoy named Ximena Rojas. And it is her story that we follow as she wrestles with feelings of loyalty and self. {4.5*}

Ghost (Track #1) by Jason Reynolds


Castle “Ghost” Cranshaw is a troublesome middle school student. Three years before, he and his mother survived a traumatic experience that resulted in his father being imprisoned for 10 years. Now, Ghost joins a track team with a coach that tries to keep him out of trouble. Ghost doesn’t change overnight. He still gets into trouble, but you can see his mentality begin to transform. It’s a relatable read. Reminded me of my thieving days, when I used to steal stuff from the Scholastic Book Fairs. Ha! {4*}


CURRENTLY READING:
2

In Other Words by Jhumpa Lahiri
I barely started listening to this audiobook. Not even half an hour through it but can already relate to wanting to learn Italian haha.

The General in His Labyrinth by Gabriel García Màrquez
Have only read about 30 pages so far. It’s based on General Simón Bolívar, “The Liberator”. Seems okay so far. 

UPCOMING READ:
Hopefully my audiobook loan of Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson comes through! OverDrive has been telling me “Available Soon” for the past week smh.

HAPPY BLOGGING EVERYONE! 😀

In at the Deep End by Kate Davies

A wonderful tale of a woman’s sexual awakening. It’s equal parts raunchy, funny, and genuine.

DESCRIPTION:

A fresh, funny, audacious debut novel about a Bridget Jones–like twenty-something who discovers that she may have simply been looking for love — and, ahem, pleasure — in all the wrong places (aka: from men)

Julia hasn’t had sex in three years. Her roommate has a boyfriend—and their sex noises are audible through the walls, maybe even throughout the neighborhood. Not to mention, she’s treading water in a dead-end job, her know-it-all therapist gives her advice she doesn’t ask for, and the men she is surrounded by are, to be polite, subpar. Enough is enough.

So when Julia gets invited to a warehouse party in a part of town where “trendy people who have lots of sex might go on a Friday night”—she readily accepts. Whom she meets there, however, is surprising: a conceptual artist, also a woman.

Julia’s sexual awakening begins; her new lesbian life, as she coins it, is exhilarating. She finds her tribe at queer swing dancing classes, and guided by her new lover Sam, she soon discovers London’s gay bars and BDSM clubs, and . . . the complexities of polyamory. Soon it becomes clear that Sam needs to call the shots, and Julia’s newfound liberation comes to bear a suspicious resemblance to entrapment . . . 

In at the Deep End is an unforgettably frank, funny, and racy odyssey through the pitfalls and seductions we encounter on the treacherous—and more often, absurd—path to love and self.

     – Goodreads


Genre(s):
Women’s Fiction, Contemporary, LGBTQIA+

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Expected Publication Date: June.4.2019

*Thank you Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for providing an ARC through a Goodreads Giveaway. All opinions expressed are my own and based solely on the book*

REVIEW: 

Julia, the protagonist, embraces her new lesbian identity and never looks back. She is very quickly introduced to BDSM and polyamory and tries to determine whether either is for her. She falls head over heels for her new girlfriend Sam, an artist. 

I absolutely loved this book. The writing is full of quips and humor. And at first glance, you get the impression everything is happy/go-lucky. But Davies subtly brings in real relationship issues and does a superb job of handling it. 

Julia is an interesting character. She is smart, anxious, and open. Watching her character develop was a journey. One I would gladly go on again. 

RATING: 4/5 stars

RECOMMEND: YES! Just keep in mind it’s sexually graphic haha 😉

HAPPY BLOGGING EVERYONE! 😀

Ayesha At Last by Uzma Jalaluddin

A lovely, romantic tale featuring horrid first impressions, a Bollywood-style wedding, and so much more! 

DESCRIPTION:


A modern-day Muslim Pride and Prejudice for a new generation of love.

Ayesha Shamsi has a lot going on. Her dreams of being a poet have been set aside for a teaching job so she can pay off her debts to her wealthy uncle. She lives with her boisterous Muslim family and is always being reminded that her flighty younger cousin, Hafsa, is close to rejecting her one hundredth marriage proposal. Though Ayesha is lonely, she doesn’t want an arranged marriage. Then she meets Khalid who is just as smart and handsome as he is conservative and judgmental. She is irritatingly attracted to someone who looks down on her choices and dresses like he belongs in the seventh century.

Ayesha is torn between how she feels about the straightforward Khalid and the unsettling new gossip she hears about his family. Looking into the rumors, she finds she has to deal with not only what she discovers about Khalid, but also the truth she realizes about herself. 

     – Goodreads

Genre(s): Romance, Fiction, Contemporary, Retelling

Publisher: Berkley Books

Expected Publication Date: June.4.2019

*Thank you First to Read for providing an ARC in exchange for a review. All opinions expressed are my own and based solely on the book*

REVIEW:

 As far as Pride and Prejudice retellings go, this is a fairly decent one. If you’re familiar with the original, then its easy to see the parallels between the two. Which isn’t a bad thing. It was entertaining trying to figure out how the big plot points of the original would unfold. Besides, there were moments where I was so completely engrossed, that I forgot it was a retelling! 

What I particularly liked was the dual viewpoint. We see what Ayesha is up to, how she feels, we understand her. We also get Khalid’s view! So his horrible first proposal? Completely makes sense because we’ve come to see how and why he acts the way he does. 

A big part of this story weaves religion (Islam) into the narrative. Both Ayesha and Khalid are devout Muslims, which is crucial to the way they interact with one another. I really liked how that was explored. 

The overall tone of the story is pretty upbeat and light-hearted. But there are moments where things got really real. It is a modern-day retelling so prejudice towards Muslims does appear. The way it was handled is important. Especially as hatred spreads through our society like wildfire. 

One thing I did not like? Lydia’s (okay, that’s not her name in this book, but I am not spoiling the story by telling you who she is) happily ever after. Ugh! Why?? She’s so annoying! :/

RATING: 3.5/5 stars

RECOMMEND? Yes! This is such a refreshing take on a classic tale. Plus, that cover! Googly heart eyes forever ❤